For the G20 – Let’s return to the original idea

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The G20 need to get back to their routes

When the finance ministers of the G7 countries proposed the G20 in the late 1990s, a good sense of realism prevailed. They recognized that addressing issues of global finance required the political support from—and involvement of—emerging market economies. This view proved prescient in seeking policy responses to the 2007–08 global financial crisis. The leaders of the G20 met at their first summit in Washington D.C. in 2008 to agree on measures to resolve the crisis through dialogues among the “systemically relevant” countries.

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For Africa, the G20 Hamburg Summit is a door stopper, not a bookend

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Big goals, small fundings

The news emerging from Hamburg were dominated by the narrative of the emerging 19 +1 on issues such as climate change or trade protectionism. Yvanka Trump replacing her father in the US seat was a particularly juicy bit, with few realizing that happened when the leaders were discussing Africa. Street protests and the 9th Beethoven symphony played in the brand-new Elbphilharmonie capped what was after all a fair attempt by Germany and Chancellor Angela Merkel to give direction to a group that has become a target of cynical criticism.

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Globale Gesundheit und die G20: Endlich Dauerthema oder doch nur Eintagsfliege?

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Globalisierung macht Gesundheit zum Thema aller

Unter der diesjährigen G20-Präsidentschaft Deutschlands stand das Thema globale Gesundheit prominent auf der Agenda und erstmals trafen sich im Vorfeld die Gesundheitsminister der beteiligten Staaten. Die Entwicklungen und Ergebnisse des G20-Gipfels weisen in die richtige Richtung, doch angesichts der großen Herausforderungen bei der globalen Gesundheit muss das Thema weiterhin besondere Aufmerksamkeit erhalten und es müssen konkreten Zusagen gemacht werden.

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Working together after Brexit: why and how Germany, the EU and the UK can continue to collaborate on international development

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Soft Brexit is unpalatable

Congratulations to Germany, first of all, on reaching 0.7. That is an achievement. We know that 25% of ODA (Official Development Assistance) in 2016 was spent on refugee costs in Germany, a fact that some German commentators have been very keen to publicise. However, we all hope 0.7 will be sustained when refugee costs begin to fall. It is an important signal of commitment, and we know it has influenced others (including France) who have yet to reach the target.

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Development cooperation between China and Germany should move beyond the donor-recipient model

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Moving beyond the traditional model

China and Germany have developed a remarkable bilateral relationship over many years. Although China still needs support from Germany in many areas, it is now time for China and Germany to build a new partnership via development cooperation modalities to contribute to global sustainable development.

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