Future of Globalisation

Future of Globalisation

Future of Globalisation provides a platform for debates on world economic issues

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Africa Alliances

Africa Alliances

Sustainable development and peace depend on economic and political developments in Africa

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Zukunft der EZ

Zukunft der EZ

Das Politikfeld Entwicklungszusammenarbeit befindet sich im Umbruch.

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Learning from the Afghanistan debacle – But what exactly?

Photo: Military Plane about to start from an airbase in Afghanistan

With the takeover of Afghanistan by the Taliban only a few weeks after the withdrawal of international troops, the mission failed to leave behind stable functioning state structures which would be resilient enough to withstand military pressure from the Taliban, care for the population and be respected by it.

Germany’s Role in EU Development Policy: From Broker to Agenda-Setter

Photo: helical treetop path

Germany is the world’s second largest development donor after the US, and the European Union’s (EU) largest aid provider. And yet its financial heft is not commensurate with its positioning on development in the EU. For the second time, Germany reached the aid target of 0.7 percent of gross national income (GNI) in 2020 (the first being in 2016, albeit in part due to its response to the high influx of refugees into the country), making significant contributions to the global pandemic response, including through the EU, COVAX, and the WHO. With a new government taking over the helm of the country and building on its financial firepower, Germany now has the opportunity to fully embrace a leadership role in the EU as an agenda-setter in development, driving forward innovative ideas, rather than as a mere broker.

Change or Crumble! Germany Needs to Reposition its International Cooperation

Image: Tracks going to the horizon

©Brigitte makes custom works from your photos, thanks a lot on Pixabay

As Angela Merkel’s 16 years at the helm of the German government come to a close, Germany’s international cooperation for sustainable development seems, at first sight, to be in good shape. During her tenure, German official development assistance (ODA) more than tripled, reaching $28 billion in 2020 and putting Germany second only to the United States ($34 billion) and well ahead of the United Kingdom ($19 billion) and the EU Institutions ($17 billion).

Four Ways the German Government Can Improve Development Effectiveness

Photo: Bundestag architecture

©Vadim Derksen, Pixabay

Over the last decade, Germany emerged as a leading provider of development finance. Since 2016, Germany has consistently been the second largest bilateral provider of official development assistance (ODA), and in 2020, it was the only G7 member to meet the 0.7 percent ODA/GNI spending target due to its generous increases in ODA in response to COVID-19. While Germany continues to provide a large quantity of ODA, it often ranks in the middle on comparative measures of development quality (for example: 2021 Quality of ODA index, Global Partnership for Effective Development Co-operation monitoring, Aid Transparency Index, and AidDATA’s Listening to Leaders survey)…