Photo: Future of Globalisation

The section Future of Globalisation in this blog provides a platform for debates on current world economic issues, global power shifts and views on the roles of formal and informal global governance institutions. It is an initiative of the German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE). The blog posts, appearing on every first and third Wednesday each month, are written by researchers from DIE and our international partners, amongst them numerous prestigious think tanks from rising powers. In this blog, the authors of the contributions represent only their personal opinion. While aiming at cutting-edge research content, the blog intends to reach a broader audience of researchers, government officials and journalists. With this blog we carry on discussions that had initially been launched in 2016 as part of the Think20 process during the German G20 presidency. In 2018, we aim at continuing the debate about the role of the G20 broadening the focus of discussion to institutional and thematic matters of global economic governance.

If you are interested to contribute, get in touch with Axel Berger and Sven Grimm of the German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE) via futureofglobalisation@die-gdi.de.

The Review of the Resident Coordinator System: Give UNDS reform a chance!

Image: Picture of the UNO General Assembly Hall

Photo by hibino on Flickr (altered), https://www.flickr.com/photos/hibino/51544029/

These days, the United Nations (UN) General Assembly is tasked with fine-tuning a centrepiece of the reform: the strengthened Resident Coordinator system – key driver of a more cohesive UN Development System (UNDS) working towards a common agenda. Negotiations have yet to reach a break-through.…

The EU’s Carbon Border Adjustment – proceed with caution

Photo: Power plant from above, Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism (CBAM)

Photo by marcinjozwiak on Pixabay

Today, the European Commission presented its “Fit-for-55” proposal which includes a Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism (CBAM). The CBAM would impose a levy on imports into the EU based on their CO2 content from 2023. As part of the European Green Deal, Commission President von der Leyen had announced this instrument two years ago in order to be able to implement more ambitious climate policy targets without energy-intensive sectors shifting their emissions abroad (carbon leakage). Following the Commission’s proposal, the CBAM must now be spelled out in detail by the EU member states and the European Parliament. Going forward, it is key to ensure that the CBAM is effective in fighting climate change, that it is WTO compatible and, above all, that it has as few ramifications as possible for foreign policy and for developing countries in particular.…

The G7 Cornwall Summit – Glass half empty or half full?

Image: Coast of Cornwall

This year’s G7 summit concluded on 13 June with the release of a 25-page leaders’ communique containing 70 paragraphs.  And yet the summit has been criticised by global health and climate campaigners (including Gordon Brown, the UK’s former Prime Minister) for failing to rise to the unprecedented challenges the world now faces.  How fair is this criticism, and is there anything the UK summit hosts might have done differently to avoid it?

Supporting South-South cooperation: Three things the UN should keep in mind

Photo: UN Building USAThis week, the United Nations (UN) High-Level Committee on South-South Cooperation convenes in New York City, and virtually. For the first time in five years, member state representatives and UN officials gather in this setting to review and advise on how the UN system engages with South-South and triangular cooperation. This contribution discusses recent developments and suggests that delegates should encourage stakeholders to

  • be more explicit about what they mean by South-South cooperation;
  • carefully explore ways to expand UN engagement with triangular schemes; and
  • ask UN entities to focus more explicitly on what South-South stakeholders need and want.

Knowledge Cooperation between Africa and Europe: The power of engagement and changing perspectives

Photo: International practicioners of the Managing Global Governance Academy 2018 learning together

As humanity, we face many common challenges in the 2020s: climate change and its effects are at the core, resulting in demands for economic transformation geared towards more sustainability. Underlying are demographic changes, with the need to feed more people while maintaining the natural basis for our survival. Increased digitalisation, global health issues (this is not the first nor the last pandemic), and strong refugee and migration movements call for a united action to address these shared global challenges. Additionally, geopolitical changes bring new important actors onto the world scene.