Photo: Future of Globalisation

The section Future of Globalisation in this blog provides a platform for debates on current world economic issues, global power shifts and views on the roles of formal and informal global governance institutions. It is an initiative of the German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE). The blog posts, appearing on every first and third Wednesday each month, are written by researchers from DIE and our international partners, amongst them numerous prestigious think tanks from rising powers. While aiming at cutting-edge research content, the blog intends to reach a broader audience of researchers, government officials and journalists. With this blog we carry on discussions that had initially been launched in 2016 as part of the Think20 process during the German G20 presidency. In 2018, we aim at continuing the debate about the role of the G20 broadening the focus of discussion to institutional and thematic matters of global economic governance.

In a time of populism, taxation cooperation could be crucial for a successful G20 summit

Image: Chinese Wall

Moving beyond the traditional model

However necessary it may be, amid an anti-elitist zeitgeist, the optics of a lavish forum that brings together leaders from twenty of the world’s largest economies cannot help but come across as a little tone-deaf. In this blog, Hugh Jorgensen explores whether taxation might be one area where the G20 could demonstrate an appreciation of, and need to respond to, the public’s apparent and growing frustration with status quo economic policy.

The T20 outlines a vision for an inclusive and cohesive G20 agenda

Image: Chinese Wall

First day of the kick-off conference

What is the best way forward for the G20 to promote a sustainable and inclusive vision for the world? At the beginning of Germany’s G20 Presidency, the T20 addressed this challenge at its own launch event in Berlin over December 1-2. In a difficult global political and economic setting, discussions focused on how to make the G20 more relevant and responsive to the lives and needs of people.

The German G20 Presidency and International Cooperation in Uncertain Times

Image: Chinese Wall

Moving beyond the traditional model

The German presidency of the Group of Twenty (G20) begins on December 1, 2016, in an even more difficult political context than the previous Chinese presidency. Due to the German federal elections scheduled for the second half of 2017, Chancellor Angela Merkel’s government moved forward the Hamburg G20 Summit to July 2017, intensifying the time-constraints on negotiators. Despite the circumstances, the forum should act with more urgency to achieve sustainable and inclusive global economic growth. In what could be a decisive year for the international economy, contributions from other members will be crucial.