Photo: Future of Globalisation

The section Future of Globalisation in this blog provides a platform for debates on current world economic issues, global power shifts and views on the roles of formal and informal global governance institutions. It is an initiative of the German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE). The blog posts, appearing on every first and third Wednesday each month, are written by researchers from DIE and our international partners, amongst them numerous prestigious think tanks from rising powers. In this blog, the authors of the contributions represent only their personal opinion. While aiming at cutting-edge research content, the blog intends to reach a broader audience of researchers, government officials and journalists. With this blog we carry on discussions that had initially been launched in 2016 as part of the Think20 process during the German G20 presidency. In 2018, we aim at continuing the debate about the role of the G20 broadening the focus of discussion to institutional and thematic matters of global economic governance.

If you are interested to contribute, get in touch with Axel Berger and Sven Grimm of the German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE) via futureofglobalisation@die-gdi.de.

The 2030 Agenda: no poverty reduction without policy coherence

Photo: Knots

Crucial actors need to commit to collaboration

G20 member countries play a crucial role in international organisations by the collective size of their economies and combined political weight, both of which are needed to make the policies of international organisations as coherent as possible to reduce poverty in Least Developed Countries (LDCs).

Image: Tools

What working people want, a guide for the German Presidency of the G20

Photo: Tools

Sustainable future for all workers

In advance of the G20 Employment Working Group meeting over March 27-28, Sharan Burrow, General Secretary of the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC), calls upon Germany’s G20 Presidency to ‘chart a course for inclusive growth’ that benefits the lives of working people. Ms Burrow is a participant in The Labour 20 (L20), which represents the interests of workers at the G20 level. It unites trade unions from G20 countries and Global Unions and is convened by the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC) and Trade Union Advisory Committee (TUAC) to the OECD.

Recommendations on Global Energy Governance and the G20

Photo: Windpower

shifting towards low-carbon technologies

As the G20 Working Groups on Sustainability, Energy and Climate are preparing to meet later this week, it is well worth reminding ourselves of the importance of the upcoming G20 summit in Hamburg for global energy governance. It is the first G20 summit since President Trump was elected on a pro-fossil fuels, climate-skeptic, and protectionist/nationalist agenda. It is also the first G20 summit since the Paris Agreement entered into force on 4 November 2016, a legally binding agreement to keep global warming ‘well below 2°C’, ratified by all G20 members except Russia and Turkey.

The Baden Baden communique demurs on historical lessons of free trade

Photo: Containerschiff

Promoting free trade and investment

Unlike the statement made by the G20 Finance Ministers last year, which asked members to resist “all forms” of trade protectionism, the communique released at this weekend’s G20 meeting in Baden Baden contains no such statement, nor does it refer to a commitment to a multilateral trading system. While there is no need to rush to any judgement, as we wait to see the final communique from the G20 leader’s summit in July this year, it may be useful to reflect on some of the lessons learnt about the role of free trade.