Schlagwort: Cooperation

G20 Summit in Osaka – The Drought Years of International Cooperation

Photo: Bridge in Osaka at nightThe G20 has been mired in an ongoing crisis for years. After the G20, newly formed ten years ago at the level of heads of state and government, initially overcame the economic and financial crisis more or less successfully, the question quickly arose as to its role beyond reacting to crisis. Instead of taking on a proactive role as a strategic steering committee for the global economy, driving reforms and ensuring the provision of global public goods (such as climate protection and free trade), the G20 proceeded to jump from one issue to the next. The fact that its presidency changes every year has contributed to this ‘issue hopping’.

The Pakistani-German relationship on international cooperation: Prospects for the 2030 Agenda

Image: Highway in Islamabad

Pakistan’s significant potential

Since its inception in 1961, the German-Pakistani relationship on development cooperation has become stronger with the passage of time. While the role of development cooperation has been significant in various sectors, there is a need to further expand and strengthen bilateral relationships in the areas of trade and investment that are equally significant for achieving sustainable development outcomes.

Working together after Brexit: why and how Germany, the EU and the UK can continue to collaborate on international development

Image: Eurostar Tunnel

Soft Brexit is unpalatable

Congratulations to Germany, first of all, on reaching 0.7. That is an achievement. We know that 25% of ODA (Official Development Assistance) in 2016 was spent on refugee costs in Germany, a fact that some German commentators have been very keen to publicise. However, we all hope 0.7 will be sustained when refugee costs begin to fall. It is an important signal of commitment, and we know it has influenced others (including France) who have yet to reach the target.

Development cooperation between China and Germany should move beyond the donor-recipient model

Image: Chinese Wall

Moving beyond the traditional model

China and Germany have developed a remarkable bilateral relationship over many years. Although China still needs support from Germany in many areas, it is now time for China and Germany to build a new partnership via development cooperation modalities to contribute to global sustainable development.

What we can expect from the Hamburg G20 Summit

Photo: Hamburg Harbour

Hamburg could mark a departure

Much of the criticism levelled at the Group of 20 (G20), the club of the world’s most economically powerful industrialised and emerging economies, is justified. The Hamburg summit will play host to high-level autocrats and, in many ways, its agenda is far removed from the needs and standards of a just, inclusive and sustainable global economy. Policy advisors still hoping for the gathering to deliver in some way are banking on an initiative supported by the EU countries and their civil societies in cooperation with several partners from the global South, an initiative designed to promote sustainability solidarity and participation.