Global Governance

The Future of Globalisation – Introducing our blog

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cityscape and network global governance
More cooperation is urgently needed

As editors, we are thrilled to launch the Future of Globalisation blog. It provides a platform for debates on current world economic issues, global power shifts and the roles of formal and informal global governance institutions and relevant networks. These debates, based on solid empirical research, are increasingly important in view of a global system fraught with mounting uncertainties. The blog posts are written by researchers from international renown institutions, amongst them numerous prestigious think tanks from rising powers, and from the German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE).

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Towards a trickle-up system of global governance

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Image: California Academy of Sciences
Science and Knowledge at the Centre

In the immediate aftermath of President Trump’s decision to leave the Paris agreement, the sixth largest economy of the world, California, signed an agreement with China to fight climate change.
While non-binding, such cooperation represents a “trickle-up” approach to global climate change governance and is part of a wave of initiatives from non-state actors including civil society, the private sector and local authorities.

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Could Hamburg signal the end of an era for the G20 as a global steering committee?

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Image: Hamburg Elbphilharmonie
Götterdämmerung in Hamburg

In a potentially ominous sign for this year’s G20 Summit, pieces from Wagner’s Götterdämmerung were played to a sold-out audience in the Elbphilarmonie (Hamburg’s new concert hall, which is also the venue for the G20 Summit starting July 7). Translated into English as ‘the Twilight of the Gods’, the opera is the final episode in the lengthy ring-cycle saga which looks at the rise and fall of rule by the supreme powers, and how infighting among the gods in Valhalla is the cause of their ultimate destruction. Were it not five hours in duration, Angela Merkel could do worse than reminding G20 leaders of the themes Wagner’s opera addresses ahead of their two days of meetings.

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